Classic Car Catalogue

International 1961

C-series Pickup
C-series Travelall
Scout 80

 

 

 


C-series Pickup


The C-series at first would have seem to have been another facelift, featuring a modernized front end, but it also have a whole new chassis with all new independent front torsion bar suspension. The new chassis and suspension allow for the cab to be mounted four inches lower, meaning an even bigger transmission tunnel hump but also a more car-like ride. The most obvious visual difference are that the twin headlights are now mounted side-by-side, and a new grille of a concave egg-crate design. The wheelbase is longer, as the front wheels are mounted further forward. This increased the front clearance angle in spite of the lower body. The range is C-100 to C-130, the heavier duty versions are not replaced as the C-Series' Gross Vehicle Weight rating now only went from 4,200 to 8,800 lb (1,900 to 4,000 kg).
 


C-99 Pickup built in Canada


C-120 Four-Wheel-Drive Crew Cab Pickup

 


C-series Travelall


From 1961 all Travelalls have four passenger doors; In April 1961 the Travelall underwent the same changes as the pickup range upon which it is based. The new C-series Travelall benefit from a whole new chassis with all new independent front torsion bar suspension. The wheelbase for the C-100/C-110 Travelall went up to 119 inches. This series is available either with a flip-down tailgate or two doors. The fold down gate have a window which wound down electrically.
 


Travelall


Travelall

 


Scout


Scout 80 was introduced in 1960. These models have removable sliding side windows, a fold-down windshield, vacuum windshield wipers mounted to the top of the windshield and an IH logo in the center of the grille. It is available in both 2 and 4 wheel drive with 100" wheelbase. 2 removable side doors, fold-down windshields, premanent bulkheads, and a choice of Half Cabs or full Traveltops. Instrument panel include a speedometer, water temperature gauge, and fuel gauge. Scouts have only one engine/transmission combination, a 152 cubic inch slant 4 with 83.4 horsepower (half of the 304 V-8) and a 3 speed transmission. Dual lever Dana 18 transfer cases and Dana 27 axles front (in 4WD models) and rear take care of the rest of the driveline. Power Lock front and rear differentials are available.
 


 


Scout


NEAT in appearance but strictly practical, the Scout is shown here in four-wheel-drive form and with the three seat cab. A two-wheel-driven version is also offered, and the body can be used open or fitted with a full-length steel top.


HALVING their V-8 engine in the manner pioneered on the Pontiac Tempest, International Harvester have produced this 2 1/3 -litre "four" which leans to the right at 45°.

POWERED by what is virtually the right-hand half of their own 5-litre V-8 lorry engine, the Scout is a new model from the Fort Wayne, Indiana factory of International Harvester Co. which will compete against Willys Jeeps, Land-Rovers, Austin Gipsies and similar models in world markets.
Over-square, the 2 1/2 -litre engine is a modern pushrod o.h.v. design, with the exhaust valves at an angle to the inlet valves. Heavy at 542 lb. complete with accessories, this engine gives 86 b.h.p. net at 4,400 r.p.m., and with its 5-bearing crankshaft is said easily to have passed a 1,000-hour full-power endurance test. A compression ratio of 8.2/1 is designed for American regular-grade petrol of 93 (Research Method) octane rating.
Alternative versions of the Scout have either 4-wheel drive or rear-wheel drive only, the same 4.27 top gear being used in either case: 2-wheel-drive examples, with an I-beam front axle and optionally a spin-limiting differential, are lighter by about 200 lb., more softly sprung, and have a rather more compact turning circle. When 4-wheel drive is specified, a transfer-box behind the 3-speed synchromesh gearbox can provide an extra reductionratio of 2.46/1 when required.
One basic body style (in any of six colours) is used for theScout, an open pick-up with the wheel-arches extended forward to form inward-facing benches, beneath one or both of which a fuel tank of 11 U.S. gallons capacity is accommodated. The tail gate can be lowered completely or held horizontally as an extension of the 60-inch body floor. Either a three-seat all-steel cab or a full-length roof can be added to the body, or for rough service the windscreen can be folded flat and the sliding glass side-windows removed from the front doors.
To suit the very varied jobs which a vehicle of this type may be required to do, International Harvester list a big variety of optional extras. Models with 4-wheel drive can have front and rear power take-offs, or a front winch, and will operate a snow plough. Other options include interior heating, arm rests and radio for the passengers: flashing turn signals, a rear bumper, a towing attachment, an oversize battery, a second fuel tank, and special tyres are available to order.

The Motor, May 1961