Voisin 1930

C14 13CV (6 cyl., 2326 cc, 66 ch; wb: 322 cm)
C15 13CV (6 cyl., 2360 cc, 64 ch; wb: 298 cm) model sport, short chassis
C12 24CV (6 cyl., 4530 cc, 105 ch; wb: 358 cm)
C16 33CV (6 cyl., 5830 cc, 130 ch; wb: 358 cm)
C22 33CV (6 cyl., 5830 cc, 120 ch; wb: 359,5 cm)
C18 22CV (V12 cyl., 4885 cc, 105 ch; wb: 358 cm)
C21 22CV (V12 cyl., 4885 cc, 105 ch; wb: 322 cm) (C18 underslung)
C20 22CV (V12 vyl., 4890 cc, 115 ch; wb: 359,5 cm)

 

C12 24 CV A 5-seater saloon (Chevauchée) was introduced for 1930, along with a 2-3 seater coupé (Chatelaine), a 6-seater limousine (Chevreuse) and a 7-seater (Caravane).
C14 13 CV is offered in bare chassis form as well as two factory saloons (Chartam and Chartéorum, the 'Lumineuse' style code named Chasserons on the C11), convertible (Duc), coupé (Chartapola) and long wheelbase saloon (Chartrain). A few technical and cosmetic changes were introduced for the 1930 model year. The 'Duc' body styled disappeared, but the others continues with only minor changes to the wings. On the mechanical front, the new models came equipped with a two-speed electromagnetic relay developed in conjunction with Cotal, allowing easy gear changes to be made from the steering wheel. It came in bare chassis form (code name Charmant), as a factory saloon (Chartreuse), coupé (Club), 7-seater (Chartrain) and lwb saloon (Caline), along with a saloon (Aquitaine) and 6-seater (Champagne) bodied by Manessius.
C15 - end of prod.
C16 33 CV Among the new models of the 1929 Salon de l'auto, Gabriel Voisin introduces the C16. Based on the C12, keeping her chassis, but the motorization evolves, the capacity in now 5830 cc, the carburation is made via two Zenith units, and gives around 130 cv.
C18 22 CV Of all the new models introduced by the company at the 1929 Salon, the C18 expressed Voisin's continuing interest in the silence, smoothnesss and inherent balance of the 60-degree V12
C20 22 CV 1930 saw the fabulous C20 sleeve valve V12 finally reach production, and it was shown at that year's Paris Salon. Initially available as a bare chassis (code Simoun),
C22 33 CV - Paris. Available in the same body styles (Myra saloon, Mylord demi-berline and Myrte cabriolet), the C22 was powered by a 5,830cc straight six based on the C16 unit instead of the V12 - the most powerful engine ever fitted to a Voisin road car. The bare 33CV chassis was coded Siroco.

 

 

C14 and C15

C14 13CV (6 cyl., 2326 cc, 66 ch; wb: 322 cm)
C15 13CV (6 cyl., 2360 cc, 64 ch; wb: 298 cm) model sport, short chassis


C14


C14

 

C12

C12 24CV (6 cyl., 4530 cc, 105 ch; wb: 358 cm)


C12 Chevauchee


C12 Chatelaine

 

C16 and C22

C16 33CV (6 cyl., 5830 cc, 130 ch; wb: 358 cm)
C22 33CV (6 cyl., 5830 cc, 120 ch; wb: 359,5 cm)

 

 

C18, C20 and C21

C18 22CV (V12 cyl., 4885 cc, 105 ch; wb: 358 cm)
C21 22CV (V12 cyl., 4885 cc, 105 ch; wb: 322 cm) (C18 underslung)
C20 22CV (V12 vyl., 4890 cc, 115 ch; wb: 359,5 cm)


C20

 

4 cylinder models

 

 

1929 brochure

 

 

 

On Sunday September 7th 1930, the record team returned to the reinforced concrete banking of the Montlhéry autodrome. There were four drivers: César and Edouard Marchand, Leroy de Presale and Van Doorninck. The run began in the evening, and the car ran for more than 17 days. When the car eventually drew to a halt just after 5 o'clock on the morning of September 25th, every target record had been broken.

Duration Average speed Mileage
11 days 123,644 kp/h 32 642 kms
12 days 124,112 kp/h 35 744 kms
13 days 128,157 kp/h 39 980 kms
14 days 123,316 kp/h 41 434 kms
15 days 121,493 kp/h 43 737 kms
16 days 121,969 kp/h 46 836 kms
17 days 119,857 kp/h 48 901 kms