Studebaker 1965

    wb: L6 cyl.
ohv
194 cu.in.
120 h.p.
V8 cyl.
ohv
283 cu.in.
195 h.p.
Commander 2 Door Sedan 109 in. Six Eight
Commander 4 Door Sedan 113 in. Six Eight
Commander 4 Door Stn Wgn 113 in. Six Eight
Cruiser 4 Door Sedan 113 in. Six Eight
Daytona 2 Door Sedan 109 in. - Eight
Daytona 4 Door Stn Wgn 113 in. - Eight

Only minor visual differences to the 1964 models. The only remaining models, sedans and station wagons, are powered by GM engines. Only 19.435 cars were sold.

Why do we call the 1965 Studebaker the Common-Sense car?
Because it's built so mechanically sound a man with reasonable driving habits can drive it for years without a major repair. Common-Sense.
Because the body style doesn't change. You save money when you buy it. You save money when you drive it. You save money when you trade it. Common-Sense.
Because it's functionally-sized at both front and rear. You can park it in incredibly short spaces. Drive over bumps and dips without nose-diving or tail-dragging. Yet, it has a full-sized six passenger middle that allows headroom for hats. And leg room for legs. Common-Sense.
Because either one of its two new engines will take you as far on a gallon of gas as a gallon of gas is meant to go. Possibly a little farther. Common-Sense.
Because Studebaker has more standard equipment features than absolutely any car in its field. Dual safety brakes, fade-proof, air-cooled brake drums, complete windshield washer system, and electric wipers are to name only a few. There are 17 more. All at no extra cost. Common-Sense.
So now you know 10 or 12 reasons why we call the 1965 Studebaker the Common-Sense car. You might find 2 or 3 of these reasons in other cars too. But all? Only in a Studebaker! As Horace Greeley once said, COMMON SENSE IS VERY UNCOMMON.


Cruiser


Daytona


Commander


Wagonaire