Rover 1956

P4 60 1997 cm³
P4 75 2230 cm³ – end of prod. (?)
P4 90 2638 cm³
P4 105 2638 cm³ – new model
T3 – prototype
Land Rover 86 – end of prod.
Land Rover 107
Land Rover 88 – new model
Land Rover 109 – new model 

 

For a long time cars produced by the Rover factory have been noted for their high standard of quality and refinement. This is still the case, and the three saloons now offered by the firm all feature comfortable seating and suspension, polished wood facia and trimmings, and the general solidity of construction which has given the make a good reputation for durability. Such relative luxuries as a free-wheel, centre and side armrests, quality floor carpets and leather upholstery add distinction to the Rover products, and the appearance of the three models available varies little. The same body is used in each case, but the choice of three different engines provides for personal requirements of fuel consumption or performance. The three engines are basically similar, and all use overhead inlet and side exhaust valves -a layout calculated primarily to give smooth running. A four-cylinder engine powers the Rover 60, while six-cylinder units are used in the 75 and 90. Minor styling changes introduced at the beginning of last month include the squaring of the front wings,. and raising the leading wing line, which now incorporates the winking indicators. The Laycock-de-Normanville overdrive, previously available only on the Rover 90, is now provided as an optional extra on the entire range. The free-wheel is not fitted on cars for which overdrive is specified.
(London report)

"105" from 1956 had 108 bhp twin carb engine, with overdrive and servo in "S" spec.

Land Rover signed a licence deal with Metalurgica de Santa Ana, Spain.

 


Rover (P4)


60 1997 cm³
75 2230 cm³
90 2638 cm³
 


Rover 90 – October

 

 


Rover (P4)


60 1997 cm³
75 2230 cm³
90 2638 cm³
105 2638 cm³
 


Rover 75 po modernizacji.

 


Rover 90


T3 – prototype


 


Rover T3


T3

T3 to pojazd eksperymentalny z wyposażony w 110-konny silnik turbinowy (52000 obr/min.) umieszczony z tyłu, napędzający 4 koła. Nadwozie wykonano z żywicy epoksydowej wzmacnianej włóknem szklanym. Rozstaw osi wynosi 2388 mm, długość całkowita 3804 mm a wysokość 1345 mm. Podczas testu T3 osiągnął prędkość 163 km/h, 'z dużym zapasem mocy'. Przyspieszenie ze startu stojącego do 100 km/h trwa zaledwie 10,5 sekundy!

THE Rover GAS TURBINE

Od czasów eksperymentalnego 'JET 1', pierwszego na świecie samochodu napędzanego turbiną gazową, zainicjowanego w roku 1946, w Solihull, w siedzibie Rover Company trwają intensywne prace. W 1955 roku powstał drugi prototyp z nadwozien typu saloon, w którym turbina umieszczona była z tyłu. Teraz przedstawiamy 'T3' - pierwszy, w pełni użyteczny, dostosowany specjalnie do napędu turbiną samochód osobowy.
Jednym z najważniejszych efektów osiągniętych przez lata badań jest zredukowanie wielkości turbiny o ponad połowę. Dlatego 'T3' reprezentuje ogromny teczniczny postęp i dzięki zaawansowanemu poziomowi sytuuje Wielką Brytanię w czołówce. Dzięki zastosowaniu wymiennika ciepła, zużycie paliwa osiągnęło możliwy do przyjęcia poziom i dalsze prace w tym kierunku powinny przynieść dalszą, znaczną poprawę.
Ten model, w żadnym wypadku nie jest produktem finalnym, prezentuje jedynie kolejny stopień rozwoju turbiny gazowej Rover. Wciąż pozostaje do rozwiązania kilkanaście problemów, zarówno w konstrukcji nadwozia jak i silnika, zanim będzie możliwe rozpoczęcie serynej produkcji tego typu samochodu.
Cytat z prospektu reklamowego.


T3

Rover T3 Coupé, a revolutionary experimental car powered by a gas-turbine. The 110-bhp power unit is mounted at the rear and develop from an industrial gas-turbine engine (1S/60). The glass-reinforced plastic body have a low bonnet line with a deep wrapround windscreen and large rear window. The T3 also have four-wheel drive-a desirable safety factor on a car that had such a high torque to weight ratio.


T3


Land Rover


86” – end of prod.
107”
88” – new model
109” – new model
 
Engine: 1997 cc, 52 bhp
 
Autumn 1956 saw the introduction of the first five-door model, on the 107 in (2,718 mm) chassis known as the "Station Wagon" with seating for up to ten people. The 86 in (2,184 mm) model was a three-door seven-seater. The new station wagons are very different from the previous Tickford model, being built with simple metal panels and bolt-together construction instead of the complex wooden structure of the older Station Wagon. They are intended to be used both as commercial vehicles as people-carriers for transporting workmen to remote locations, as well as by private users. Like the Tickford version, they come with basic interior trim and equipment such as roof vents and interior lights.

Wheelbases were extended by 2 in to 88 in (2,235 mm) and 109 in (2,768 mm) to accommodate the new diesel engine, to be an option the following year. This change was made to all models with the exception of the 107 Station Wagon.

3046 MK 3 were ordered and delivered for the military during 1955 and 1956.
 

Land Rover


Land-Rover 86 in its standard form with canvas tilt, as produced during 1953-56. It was available also with hard-top. Station Wagons were supplied on this Regular 86 chassis, (from 1954), as well as on the 107-in long-wheelbase chassis (from 1955), the latter model featuring two doors on each side and ten seats. In June 1956 the 86-in wheelbase Regular models received modifications to front wings and bonnet, and their wheelbase was increased to 88 inches.

 


 


 

 
 
All round the world, anywhere on earth in fact, four-wheel drive Land-Rovers are doing work that no other vehicles can do. "Impossible" conditions have been overcome and "inaccessible" places reached by these ubiquitous machines whose unconquerable stamina and go-anywhere qualities have made them almost indispensable in many operational spheres.
 
From the equator to the arctic, high altitudes or low, in monsoon or drought, pulling, pushing, carrying or driving machinery, the amazing Land-Rover fills the bill in the same efficient and economical way. And its rugged construction, with incorrodible bodywork, ensures long trouble-free service.
 
There are five basic Land-Rover models, each having a range of optional extra equipment to meet every probable or improbable need.
 


86


86


107


107


86


 


 


 


86


86


107


107


86


 


 


 

WHAT WILL THE LAND-Rover DO?
 
It has already been established that Land-Rovers will go virtually anywhere, that they are powerful, economical to run, surprisingly comfortable to ride in and provided with a wide range of body and power take-off equipment. Furthermore, they are non-corroding and non-rusting, and may therefore be operated continuously in every sort of climate and over the most appalling ground conditions.
These facts indicate an almost unlimited field of operation for the world's most versatile vehicle, and the following list showing some of the uses to which the Land-Rover has actually been put will provide ample proof of its "do-anything", "go-anywhere" powers.
Land-Rovers are taking a very active part in the sphere of agriculture and will efficiently undertake the following duties :
 
GENERAL
Hay Sweeping. Crop Spraying and Dusting.
Pumping. Tree Felling and Ground Clearance.
Transporting Stock to Market.
 
TOWING
Cultivators. Water Trailers. Harrows.
Horse Boxes. Rollers. Fertilizers.
Gang Mowers. Horse Rakes. Binders.
Two- and four-wheeled Load Carrying Trailers.
Combine Harvesters
 
TOWING AND DRIVING
Rick Elevators. Hammer Mills Mobile Milking Machinery.
Silage Blowers. Hedge Cutters. Saw Benches.
Compressors for Paint Sprayers, Scaling Tools, Riveters, etc.
 
TYPICAL USERS
Agricultural Development Teams. Botanical Survey Teams.
Colonial Soil Survey Teams. Forestry Commissions.
Game Wardens. Game Preservation Units.
Estate Supervisors. Dairy Companies.
 
Agriculture is however only one sphere of Land-Rover usefulness, for it plays a great many other parts. Some of its more interesting tasks include :
 
Mountain Rescue. Malarial Control. Colonial Development. Public Works.
Education. Tsetse Fly Control. Fire Fighting. United Nations (UNESCO)
Ambulance Service. Water Supply. Geological Survey. World Health Organisation.
Highway Maintenance. Seismograph Service. Exploration.
Oil Field Prospecting and Maintenance.
River Maintenance. Irrigation Control. Copper Mine Prospecting.
Locust Control. Scientific and Industrial Research.
 
Land-Rovers also do important work for Government Departments, such as :
 
Customs and Excise. Police Departments. Coal Boards. Post Offices.
Electricity Supply Boards. Railways. Fisheries Department.
Income Tax Inspectors and Collectors.
Labour Departments. Lighthouse Authorities. Crown Agents.
 
The Armed Services of many countries operate large numbers of Land-Rovers which are outstanding for this type of work :
 
Great Britain ... Navy, Army, Air Force.
New Zealand ... Army, Air Force.
Uruguay ... Ministry of National Defence.
Indo-China ... Armee Royal Khmere, Forces Armee Hoa-Hoa, Garde Nationale du Nord-Vietnam.
Angola ... Navy Station, Frontier Guard.
Ecuador ... Ministry of Defence and Military Zone 2 Guayaquil.
Ethiopia ... Ministry of War.
Australia ... Navy.
Brazil ... Navy, Army, Air Force.
Denmark ... Military Service.
Malaya ... Security Forces.
Lebanon ... Army.
Jordan ... Arab Legion, Royal Palace Guard.
Iran ... Army.
Casablanca ... Auxiliary Forces.
Belgium ... Army.
Holland ... Navy, Marines.
 
In addition, Land-Rovers are used by the Police Forces of the following territories:
 
Mauritius. Martinique. Thailand. Trinidad. Turkey. Nigeria.
Uruguay. Lebanon. Indo-China. Kenya. Angola. Uganda.
Ecuador. Tanganyika. Ethiopia. Bahrain. Hong Kong. Saudi Arabia.
Iran. French West Africa. Brazil. Tunisia. Gold Coast. Belgium.
Canada (Royal Canadian Mounted Police). Ceylon.